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    In many elections people have disputed the way we choose our president. Especially in the 2000 election in which our president was voted in with a minority of popular votes which has also occurred in 1824, 1876, and 1888. People have stated that it is thus undemocratic because the person who did not receive the majority of the votes became president. This is because the founding fathers wanted to protect against tyranny and other dangers with having a popular vote and in addition giving more power to less populated states. Which can be discussed at a later time, as of now I would like to discuss why it would be more democratic and more inciting for individuals to support a proportional electoral college.

     

    . The proportional Electoral College would take the percentage of the votes and distribute the electoral votes out accordingly, in certain models of a proportional system there are differences, in this blog I will only talk about one. Take Maryland for instance, it has 10 electoral votes, which means that each vote is worth 10% of the vote within the state. In the instance that Party 1 received 50% of the vote of Maryland, Party 2 received 30% of the vote and Party 3 received 20% of the vote. The distribution would be: Party 1 receives five electoral votes, Party 2 receives three electoral votes and Party 3 receives two electoral votes. In the instance that the distribution is not so nice, where Party 1 receives 43 %, Party 2 receives 45% and Party 3 receives 12% the distribution would be: Party 1 receives 4 votes, Party 2 receives 5 votes and Party 3 receives 1 vote. Party 2 receives 5 votes because when taking 45% and dividing by 10% there is 4 votes with a remainder of 5%, in Party 1 and its 43% is 4 votes with a remainder of 3% and Party 3 is 1 vote with a remainder of 2% and the last vote goes to whoever has the highest percentage remainder which would be Party 2.

    In the current electoral system in most states (excluding Maine and Nebraska), if a candidate would win a state 51% to 49% he or she would receive all the electoral votes of that state. This means that 49% of the vote in that state is disregarded in the tally and basically has the same effect as if the state voted for that one candidate 100%. I believe this to be wrong and undemocratic. In the proportional system the vote would be more 1 to 1, obviously not perfect with the second example I showed you with 5% of the vote being cast aside. However, If we could have fractions of electoral votes, this system would (in my opinion) be best for 1 to 1 voting, because it would be 1 to 1, but that would have to come in a constitutional amendment.

    This way of allocating the electoral votes in the Electoral College would be more democratic and incite people to feel that their vote matters, because it would! At the same time it would retain the integrity of the Electoral College. This is just one possible solution to solve the voter turnout rate in America, the faith in our voting system and a uphold democracy in our nation.

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