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    On Tuesday October 14th, 2010 U.S. District Judge Virginia Phillips, in Riverside California, ordered the military "immediately to suspend and discontinue any investigation" or other proceeding to dismiss gay service members. The infamous 1993 "don't ask, don't tell" law states homosexuals may serve in the military, but only if they keep undisclosed their sexual orientation. . Phillips notes that the law "infringes the fundamental rights" of current and prospective service members. The Don't Ask, Don't Tell policy continues to be a controversial source of tension between democrats and republicans and the policy itself, being of federal context, hits home in every state of the union. The restrictive policy discourages openness and truth and is said, by liberals, to discourage willing troops to enlist. Liberal minds see no problem with openness over sexual orientation and suggest the law implies that the government overall opposes homosexuality as a whole. Conservative minds feel oppositely. Key player Robert Gates, Pentagon Chief and open conservative, comments that the purpose isn't to determine whether to change the Don't Ask, Don't Tell law, which he says is probably inevitable, but to determine how to end the policy without causing serious disruption. The major fear is that a policy change of this nature will weaken a military at war.

    In response to such claims Maj. Gen. John Campbell, commander of the 101st Airborne Division comments, "If that law is changed, they'll abide by the law," but "that's probably the farthest thing from their mind as they fight."

    During the Clinton administration, Clinton was unable to repeal the Defense Department ban on gays in the military. Instead, he created DADT, allowing members of the LGBT community to serve in the military. President Barack Obama declared that annulling DADT would be a priority of his administration during his election campaigning. Defense Secretary Robert Gates and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen have also stated recently that DADT is out of date and should be repealed. And while the repeal was recently approved in the House, the Senate was unable to get the votes needed to send it to a conference committee. While 69 percent of Americans support the repeal, according to a Gallup poll, the Senate hasn't responded to the public's demands to repeal the law.

    It is obvious that as the proceedings to get legislation passed in efforts to remove the ban on open homosexuality in the U.S military move forward party tension looms overhead. However, the Obama Administration and like minded liberals feel positive about the outcome of future proceedings. White house Speaker Robert Gibbs told reporters that the recent court rulings prove that time is indeed running out on the don't ask, don't tell policy. Ban on gays serving openly is, "a policy that is going to end." While the Obama Administration supports repealing the ban, the administration puts their faith in congress to make ultimate waves.

    Sources
    Read more: U.S. mulls appeal of Don't Ask, Don't Tell ban | freep.com | Detroit Free Press http://www.freep.com/article/20101014/NEWS07/10140549/1322/U.S.-mulls-appeal-of-Dont-Ask-Dont-Tell-ban#ixzz12k04N5XE

    Read more: White House: Time 'running out' on gay service ban | freep.com | Detroit Free Press http://www.freep.com/article/20101013/NEWS15/101013033/1285/White-House-Time-running-out-on-gay-service-ban#ixzz12jzEr0Pf

    http://www.michigandaily.com/content/daily-dont-keep-dont-ask-dont-tell

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