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    Under PA 116 a home family child care in Michigan is considered temporary if it is in operation for less than four weeks out of the year. After four weeks the service can no longer be deemed as temporary. This four week widow allows families flexibility with emergencies or other short-term care. A Michigan family accused of running an illegal daycare lead to the creation of House Bill (HB), 5512.

     

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    A mother in Michigan has to leave for work before the bus comes to pick her children up, so she leaves her children with a neighborhood friend. Her friend conveniently lives at the local bus stop so some of her neighborhood friends leave their children with her in the morning. Not too long after the school year began there was a complaint and the Department of Human Services sent a letter to this house for violating PA 116, by running and illegal day care. PA 116 of 1973 that “provide for the protection of children” (Calley). In response,, HB 5512 was created to exempt casual babysitting from being part of running a day care business. The intent is to prevent the “interruption for good neighborly acts” (Calley). However, not everyone feels that protecting neighborly acts should supersede the protection of children.

    The Michigan Association for the Education for Young Children does not support this bill, for it “weakens the rules that protect children when receiving care outside of their homes.” They believe that being defined as being a day care or babysitting does not matter because the same service is being provided; regardless of the title children’s rights need to be protected. The Michigan Association for the Education for Young Children believes that child care regulations are a necessity because children getting care outside of the home are entitled to healthy and safe that will help them develop. A child’s development at a young age is important because it sets a foundation for their development. The regulation in place secure children’s rights by making sure that the service provided educates children that promotes healthy development and makes sure the children are not in danger. These regulations just ensure that children are getting the best care possible.

    Sources:

    http://house.mi.gov/SessionDocs/2009-2010/Testimony/Committee8-10-21-2009.pdf

    http://house.mi.gov/SessionDocs/2009-2010/Testimony/Committee8-10-21-2009-1.pdf

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    The Michigan Policy Network is a student-led public education and research program to report and organize news and information about the political process surrounding Michigan state policy issues. It is run out of the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University, with participation by students from the College of Social Science, the College of Communication, and James Madison College. 

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    Jocelyn Cutean serves as Morality and Family policy correspondent for the Michigan Policy Network. She is a first-year student at Michigan State, majoring in Theatre and English. Jocelyn has experience working on the executive board of the Waterford Chapter Coalition for Youth. She has also piloted a grant funded city wide public service announcement entitled, "It Just Wasn't Worth It" which exposes the repercussions of driving while intoxicated. Jocelyn enjoys art of all forms, from writing to performance.