• yourjizzx cum
  • National Context

    State public funding of abortion is affected by two things: Medicaid and the Hyde Amendment. In 1965, Medicaid was first authorized. Since then, it has provided low-income families with health care. After the case of Roe v. Wade, all state Medicaid programs covered abortions without any restrictions. The Hyde Amendment which was enacted in 1976 limited federal funding for abortion care. Under the Hyde Amendment, specifications have been made that designates what abortion services are covered under Medicaid. Presently, Medicaid only covers abortions unless in the case of rape, incest, or if the woman's life is endangered. Even if a state has laws that are more restrictive than the Hyde Amendment, abortions must be covered under these specifications. Since the Hyde Amendment, the majority of the states have adopted this policy as their own with the exception of four states. Hawaii, Washington, and New York fund provide funding voluntarily if the woman's life is in endangered. Maryland also funds abortions voluntarily in the case of fetal abnormality. Only 17 states publicly fund abortion for low-income women on the same or similar basis as other pregnancy or health related issues while 13 states have declared independent protection for reproductive choice and have non-discrimatory public funding for abortion. None of these states are located in the Midwest. .

    In the Midwest, seven states have adopted the policy of the Hyde Amendment. Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and North Dakota all only offer public state funding for abortion in the cases of rape, incest, and life endangerment. In Wisconsin, public funding for abortion is only available in cases of rape, incest, life endangerment, and when it becomes necessary to prevent long-lasting damage to the woman's health. In Kansas and Illinois, abortion is covered under private insurance policies only in the case of life endangerment, but the states must also comply with the conditions set under the Hyde Amendment.

    Of all the Midwest states, South Dakota is the most conservative when it comes to providing funding for abortions. State public funding for abortion is only available in the case of life endangerment. And if Roe v. Wade would ever be overturned in the future, abortion would be banned altogether. Besides limiting public funding for women seeking abortions, South Dakota also requires women to wait 72 hours between their initial appointment and their actual abortion-the longest waiting period required of all states. Women must also undergo counseling from pregnancy crisis centers which discourage the practice of abortions. Under South Dakota law, life is defined as beginning at conception, and the state also requires parental consent before a minor can receive an abortion.

    Compared to South Dakota's lowest abortion rates in the United States, New York has the highest abortion rates and the least amount of restrictions on abortions. Most of New York's abortions are performed in New York City. Overall, New York performs the most abortions to minors, the most repeat abortions, and the most abortions that are considered late term (after 21 weeks) than anywhere else in the United States. Medicaid is not restricted, and it pays for low-income women seeking abortions. Also, minors do not need parental consent before receiving an abortion, and there are no required waiting periods (the most common waiting period mandated by other states is 24 hours). New York has thirty-four major clinics that perform over 400 abortions each year compared to South Dakota which only has two clinics that are licensed to perform abortions.

    While the vast majority of the states have taken the Hyde Amendment as their own policy, a few states do offer other funding voluntarily. Most of the Midwest states have followed the trend of also providing public funding for abortions only in the case of rape, incest, and life endangerment, but this does not necessarily mean that Medicaid actually reimburses them. It has been shown that more than half of the abortions performed that are eligible for reimbursement from Medicaid under the Hyde Amendment are not reimbursed. According to various hospitals and doctors, the paperwork to receive reimbursement from Medicaid is too extensive and time-consuming. This leads to women, who are eligible for reimbursement under Medicaid, to give birth instead. Various police statements and doctors' notes are required before even being considered to receive reimbursement. This causes the process to be long and drawn-out and most doctors say that it is easier to fund abortions for low-income women through non-profit organizations.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Works Cited
    Hetland, Cara. "In South Dakota, Abortion Fight Goes On." NPR.org. 25 Mar. 2011. 28 Sept. 2012. .

    Lizza, Ryan. "The Abortion Capital of America." Nymag.com. 4 Dec. 2004. 28 Sept. 2012. .

    Matthews, Dylan. "How Do Rape Exceptions Work?" Washingtonpost.com. Washington Post, 21 Aug. 2012. 1 Oct. 2012. .

    "Public Funding for Abortion." ACLU.org. ACLU, 21 July 2004. 24 Sept. 2012. .

    "Public Funding for Abortion: Medicaid and the Hyde Amendment." Prochoice.org. National Abortion Federation, 2006. 24 Sept. 2012. .

    National Family Policy News

    Feed not found.
    Home
    Agriculture
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Commerce & Regulation
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Criminal Justice
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    In The Courts
    Timeline
    Employment
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Great Lakes & Recreation
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Energy and Environment
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Health Care
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    K-12 Education
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Morality and Family
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Political Reform
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Social Services & Seniors
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    State Budget
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Taxes
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Transportation
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Urban Affairs
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline

    About Us

    The Michigan Policy Network is a student-led public education and research program to report and organize news and information about the political process surrounding Michigan state policy issues. It is run out of the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University, with participation by students from the College of Social Science, the College of Communication, and James Madison College. 

    Read more about us...

    Sponsors

    Michigan State University    Department of Political Science 
     College of Communication Arts & Sciences    James Madison College
     College of Social Science    University Outreach and Engagement

     

    The thoughts, opinions, and positions represented herein are solely those of the participating students and in no way represent an official position or policy recommendation of Michigan State University.

    Our sponsors...

    Meet your Policy Fellow: Jocelyn Cutean

    Jocelyn Cutean serves as Morality and Family policy correspondent for the Michigan Policy Network. She is a first-year student at Michigan State, majoring in Theatre and English. Jocelyn has experience working on the executive board of the Waterford Chapter Coalition for Youth. She has also piloted a grant funded city wide public service announcement entitled, "It Just Wasn't Worth It" which exposes the repercussions of driving while intoxicated. Jocelyn enjoys art of all forms, from writing to performance.