• yourjizzx cum
  • Current Issues

    After three years of unsuccessful reform, columnists are calling out for a radical reform in Detroit Public Schools.

    The system itself has created unsatisfactory results with unbalanced expenses. Detroit Public Schools have been one of the worst performing school districts in Michigan while Michigan Education ranks near the bottom in national. On the other hand, Detroit Public Schools have been suffering from financial problems. In fact, Detroit Public Schools has been under financial emergency since the state superintendent declared it in 2008. Robert Bobb, the emergency financial manager, took on the job to fix Detroit Public Schools.

                Since then, Bobb has closed down 59 schools, lay off numerous teachers and consolidate bus services in order to save the financially burdened Detroit Public Schools. However, these measures were of no avail. The school district is now facing a $327 million deficit. In addition, Bobb’s recent proposals exemplified how serious the situation is.

                One of the possibilities is for the state to forgive the deficit of Detroit Public Schools. Under this premise, the Detroit Public Schools then can go through some radical restructuring. Bobb propose to break up Detroit Public Schools into two smaller school districts- one of them would carry the deficit of the original Detroit Public Schools while the other one is debt free. The debt-free district will carry some of the ideals outlined in the Race to the Top which is thought to be structurally beneficial.

                The alternative would be “draconian” cuts that would result in bigger class sizes, school closure and any other necessary measures. Bobb estimated high school class size would be 62 under the plan and 72 schools will be closed in order to bring Detroit Public Schools back to the black in 2014.

                Under the current economic hardship in state and the national level, many view that Bobb’s proposal is either financially impossible or politically unfavorable. Sadly, these two options seem to be the only options that are on the table. Other influential leaders on Detroit Public School issues, such as Mayor of Detroit, a Detroit city legislator, or a city council member, haven’t presented any solution for the future of DPS. Columnists have been calling for the leaders to stand up and offer their leadership to solve the puzzle of Detroit Public Schools. They believe that Bobb’s proposal shouldn’t be viewed as the only solution. Instead, Bobb’s proposal should open some room for brainstorming for better solutions.

    Sources:

    http://www.freep.com/article/20110116/COL33/101160468/1322/DPS-needs-a-fix----a-radical-one

    http://www.detnews.com/article/20110116/OPINION03/101160304/1026/Column--Governor--tear-down-these-schools

    .
    Home
    Agriculture
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Commerce & Regulation
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Criminal Justice
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    In The Courts
    Timeline
    Employment
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Great Lakes & Recreation
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Energy and Environment
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Health Care
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    K-12 Education
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Morality and Family
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Political Reform
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Social Services & Seniors
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    State Budget
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Taxes
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Transportation
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Urban Affairs
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline

    About Us

    The Michigan Policy Network is a student-led public education and research program to report and organize news and information about the political process surrounding Michigan state policy issues. It is run out of the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University, with participation by students from the College of Social Science, the College of Communication, and James Madison College. 

    Read more about us...

    Sponsors

    Michigan State University    Department of Political Science 
     College of Communication Arts & Sciences    James Madison College
     College of Social Science    University Outreach and Engagement

     

    The thoughts, opinions, and positions represented herein are solely those of the participating students and in no way represent an official position or policy recommendation of Michigan State University.

    Our sponsors...

    Meet your Policy Fellow: Andy Chou and Andrew Revard

    Andy Chou and Andrew Revard are Education Policy Correspondents for the Michigan Policy Network. Andy is a first-year student in Economics at Michigan State University. Andrew is a senior in Political Science at MSU.