• yourjizzx cum
  • Current Issues

    The struggles between Detroit School Board and Detroit Public School Emergency Financial Manager Robert Bobb created a lot of steam last year. The tensions subdued as the court ruled Bobb as abusing his role as Emergency Financial Manager. In the wake of the court decision, a lot of discussion has stemmed from Bobb’s comment: “Public Act 72 should be revisited.”

    What is Public Act 72? Simply put, it is the emergency financial manager act. It states that the governor has the power to declare a Financial Emergency in cities and school districts after running through certain steps. Afterwards, the secretary of treasury convenes a committee to pick and appoint an emergency financial manager in hopes to overturn the city or school district.

    According to the Michigan Treasury, there have been seven declarations of a Financial Emergency and nine emergency financial managers appointed. As more and more municipalities and school districts become potential candidates of Financial Emergencies due to the gloomy economy in the past few years, Public Act 72 become more important as one of the state’s financial last steps.

    As there are success stories and failures of emergency financial managements, it is still too early to see if the notion presented by Public Act 72 is overall beneficial or not. However, Public Act 72 is not perfect. Experts and journalists have identified some problems in Public Act 72. Most importantly, people believe Public Act 72 introduces steps that slow down the speed of sending an emergency financial manager. The financial problems stack up so fast that when the emergency financial manager is finally appointed, there is not much left to do. Furthermore, the emergency financial managers were not given enough power to trim some of the tricky parts in state finance, including labor contracts.

    Lou Schimmel, the former emergency financial manager in the city of Hamtramck, wrote in an article on necessary changes to make the role of emergency financial managers suitable. His points are summarized as follows,

    1)      Emergency Financial Managers should be protected from lawsuits by law.

    2)      Emergency Financial Managers should be given the power equivalent to those in the governing body(mayor and council or school board)

    3)      Emergency Financial Managers should have the power to review charter provisions

    4)      Public Act 312, which mandates that when a municipality and union cannot agree on the terms of a new contract they must go to binding arbitration, should be repealed

    Governor Rick Snyder mentioned reviewing Public Act 72 as one of the fixes for Michigan. There is also a seminar held in Michigan State University to train potential candidates for Emergency Financial Managers. All the pieces are set in place, it’s up to the governor and the legislators how this will go.

    Sources: http://www.mackinac.org/14290

                http://www.michigan.gov/treasury/0,1607,7-121-1751_51556-201116--,00.html

                http://www.freep.com/article/20110120/OPINION02/101200553/1318/Gov.-Rick-Snyders-attention-to-detail-shows-he-gets-it-plans-to-aid-cities-schools-in-crisis

                http://www.freep.com/article/20110118/OPINION01/101180313/1322/Prevent-budget-emergencies

    .
    Home
    Agriculture
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Commerce & Regulation
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Criminal Justice
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    In The Courts
    Timeline
    Employment
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Great Lakes & Recreation
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Energy and Environment
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Health Care
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    K-12 Education
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Morality and Family
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Political Reform
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Social Services & Seniors
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    State Budget
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Taxes
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Transportation
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Urban Affairs
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline

    About Us

    The Michigan Policy Network is a student-led public education and research program to report and organize news and information about the political process surrounding Michigan state policy issues. It is run out of the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University, with participation by students from the College of Social Science, the College of Communication, and James Madison College. 

    Read more about us...

    Sponsors

    Michigan State University    Department of Political Science 
     College of Communication Arts & Sciences    James Madison College
     College of Social Science    University Outreach and Engagement

     

    The thoughts, opinions, and positions represented herein are solely those of the participating students and in no way represent an official position or policy recommendation of Michigan State University.

    Our sponsors...

    Meet your Policy Fellow: Andy Chou and Andrew Revard

    Andy Chou and Andrew Revard are Education Policy Correspondents for the Michigan Policy Network. Andy is a first-year student in Economics at Michigan State University. Andrew is a senior in Political Science at MSU.