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    On March 23, 2010, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which had been passed by the House on March 21, 2010, into law. Besides, the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, which had been passed by the Senate on March 25, 2010, was also signed into law on March 30. The implication from that is the state, especially Michigan, should implement the Federal law in the State.

    . To implement some aspects in the Federal law, State Sen. Tom George, R-Kalamazoo, and Rep. Mark Corriveau, D-Northville sponsor the new legislation. The new bill contains prohibition for insurers from excluding or canceling coverage for pre-existing conditions for people moving from employer-based insurance to the individual market and lowering the waiting period to cover pre-existing conditions from one year to six months and allow young adults 26 or younger to stay on their parents' health plan. However, the major aspects of the federal reform, such as adding more than 300,000 uninsured people to insurance rolls cannot be applied in Michigan until 2014 because of the high number of Michigan uninsured people (1.1 million in 2009). The overall goal of the bill is to reduce overall insurance rates by 20 percent.

    Mark Cook, as the interest group from the state's largest insurer, supports the legislation as long as it ensures fair taxation and regulation among insurance carriers. The other interest group comes from a new MI-Health board. They comprised of health professionals and insurers, and a consumer advocate would craft essentially two sets of insurance plans, which are enhanced plans and low-cost standard plans. The Michigan association of Health Plans, which represents most health insurers in the state, said there should be state legislation to ensure a more orderly transition to national health care reform over the next four years. The advocacy group for health consumers, the Michigan Universal Health Care Access Network, likes some aspects of the proposed legislation.

    The opposite idea for the bill comes from the Republicans. Attorney General Mike Cox criticizes the state legislation for reducing the rate of the regulation. About a year ago, they stopped an attempt by Blue Cross to kill oversight when they set rates on Michigan families.

    To build support and make the proposal pass this year, the proposal sponsor has been making the rounds in media and some groups in recent weeks. Committee hearings will begin within two weeks.
    The potential implication from the proposal if it is passed is that a lot of Michigan citizens will be able to afford the health cost through the insurance which they will have because of the reduction of overall insurance rates by 20 percent. For example, Karen Turner will be able to do her cataract operation. However, the problems will still exist for the unemployed in Michigan, although the overall insurance is deducted by 20 percent. They still cannot afford the health cost because they have no ability to pay for the insurance. Besides, the State of Michigan does not have the ability to increase the health care expense, which is the biggest expense in state government. This is because the Michigan economic decline makes Michigan have to do budget cuts in the cost of health care.

    Source:
    http://www.lansingstatejournal.com/article/20100502/NEWS04/5020603/1005/NEWS04/Lawmakers--2014-too-long-to-wait-for-health-reform

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    The Michigan Policy Network is a student-led public education and research program to report and organize news and information about the political process surrounding Michigan state policy issues. It is run out of the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University, with participation by students from the College of Social Science, the College of Communication, and James Madison College. 

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