• yourjizzx cum
  • Current Issues

    “Your trip begins at michigan.org.”

    Any Michigander with cable television knows those words all too well. Accompanied by beautiful, picturesque scenes, a pretty piano piece, and a soothing voice talking about all of Michigan’s greatest qualities, the Pure Michigan advertising campaign is the stuff of legend. Countless parodies have been made of the ads, and they’ve been joked about by many, but the nostalgia the ads bring have still had success amongst viewers.

    However, it’s looking like the ads might not get their chance to spread the delightful joys of Michigan much longer. The budget for the 2011 fiscal year was cut to $5.4 million from its initial $30 million, and state tourism officials recently announced the advertising campaign would be cancelled if they didn’t receive a funding boost from the state government. With a lame duck Congress about to be adjourned, they likely won’t obtain any more funds.

    Cheesy as they might be, the Pure Michigan ads have worked for Michigan in the past. In an independent study, it was found that the campaign brought 5 million new out-of-state visitors during summers 2006 to 2009, and those visitors spent $1.3 billion in Michigan businesses and paid $93 million in Michigan taxes. Essentially, for each dollar spent on the advertising, the state got $2.94 back.

    The campaign’s achievements haven’t gone unnoticed. Forbes Magazine named the campaign one of the ten best tourism ad campaigns of all time in 2009, and was recognized by the U.S. Travel Association as the Best State Tourism Advertising Campaign.

    From this data, cutting the program entirely doesn’t make any sense. The main goal is to rebuild Michigan’s economy, and when something is clearly working towards promoting that and is doing so effectively it should be nurtured as such.

    Some would argue there are better things for the state to be spending its money on at the moment, but when there is a significant profit to be made off a program, it’s certainly something that should be supported. Tourism is a huge aspect of Michigan’s economy, with visitors spending over $15.1 billion annually, creating $850 million in state taxes and supporting at least 142,500 jobs for Michigan residents. If this industry could be grown, it could give Michigan the extra revenue needed to fund other projects affected by the budget crisis.

    Many lawmakers say they support the campaign, but they aren’t sure how to fund it because of the state’s budget problems. Governor-elect Rick Snyder supports the campaign and said he would make it a priority to fund the campaign in January if the issue is not solved before the session closes. Good thing, too – with a budget in crisis, the more revenue the state can get from taxes, the better.

    Regardless of how silly the advertisements might seem to Michigan residents, they should still be glad if they get the chance to see them on television in the upcoming year. Even if one’s heart isn’t moved by the beauteous shots of waterfalls, bustling cities and nostalgic activities, it should be moved by the idea that such advertisements could help bring Michigan back to a more pleasant economic state.

    Sources:

    http://www.freep.com/article/20101201/FEATURES07/12010353/1322/Pure-Michigan-winter-tourism-campaign-in-danger-of-losing-funding

    http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D9JR476O0.htm

    http://www.whtc.com/news/articles/2010/dec/01/pure-michigan-campaign-could-die-end-week/

    http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/pure-michigan-wins-top-award-111188794.html

    .
    Home
    Agriculture
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Commerce & Regulation
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Criminal Justice
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    In The Courts
    Timeline
    Employment
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Great Lakes & Recreation
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Energy and Environment
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Health Care
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    K-12 Education
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Morality and Family
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Political Reform
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Social Services & Seniors
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    State Budget
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Taxes
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Transportation
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Urban Affairs
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline

    About Us

    The Michigan Policy Network is a student-led public education and research program to report and organize news and information about the political process surrounding Michigan state policy issues. It is run out of the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University, with participation by students from the College of Social Science, the College of Communication, and James Madison College. 

    Read more about us...

    Sponsors

    Michigan State University    Department of Political Science 
     College of Communication Arts & Sciences    James Madison College
     College of Social Science    University Outreach and Engagement

     

    The thoughts, opinions, and positions represented herein are solely those of the participating students and in no way represent an official position or policy recommendation of Michigan State University.

    Our sponsors...

    Meet your Policy Fellow: Great Lakes and Recreation

    Great Lakes & Recreation Policy Fellow