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    In the opinions of a few restaurant owners and policy makers, the best solution to the Asian carp problem in the Great Lakes is to eat them.

    . Jimmy Wade, a chef in Wisconsin, recently held an "invasivore" dinner which featured a few invasive Asian carp species, fish not native to the Americas which are threatening the Great Lakes. The trend has grown in popularity among those interested in eradicating the carp and those interested in trying new dishes.

    A bottom-feeding fish species, the silver carp typically yields 20 to 25 percent meat available for human consumption. Though the fish is viewed as a delicacy in China, the taste has not been an altogether popular in the United States.

    Previous attempts to eradicate the fish have included poisoning the waters in which they reside and two electric barriers put in place to prevent them from coming into the Great Lakes. The idea of putting in a physical barrier between the waterways containing carp and

    The idea of eating the fish, as well as selling them for consumption overseas, has been looked at on the national scale as well. John Goss, Asian carp director of the White House Council on Environmental Quality, suggested selling the carp to Chinese markets and promoting American consumption as well. The idea is included in the Obama administration's $47 million "2011 Asian Carp Control Strategy Framework" plan, among other suggestions.

    Some scientists and environmental groups aren't sold on the idea, however.

    According to some environmentalists, human predation could help slow down the carp as they near the Great Lakes border and allow more time for lawmakers and policy leaders to decide what the best solution to stop the potentially devastating fish species. However, it could create a taste for the fish in America, which could potentially promote the creation of Asian carp fisheries instead of eliminating them.
    Sources:

    http://www.jsonline.com/news/wisconsin/114043564.html

    http://www.startribune.com/local/114321859.html?elr=KArks:DCiUHc3E7_V_nDaycUiD3aPc:_Yyc:aULPQL7PQLanchO7DiUr

    http://www.smartplanet.com/business/blog/business-brains/can-we-eat-our-way-out-of-the-asian-carp-invasion/13029/

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