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    In an effort to generate revenue for the state of Michigan, Governor Granholm has suggested different options dealing with the sale of alcohol. She has proposed the allowance of bars to stay open until 4 AM rather than 2 AM, by means of the owners purchasing a permit that would allow this. These permits would cost somewhere around $1500 and would be the source of revenue for Michigan’s government. Her other proposal is allowing establishments to sell alcohol before noon on Sundays, which would also require the purchasing of a permit.

    .

    There are many advantages and disadvantages to this legislation. For example, bars will reap greater profits from the extra time that they are allowed to sell and distribute alcohol. This in turn, will allow the state to gain more revenue due to the increase of permit prices. This legislation would be more beneficial in certain cities compared to others due to the higher propensity of people to go to bars versus other cities. According to Governor Granholm, this revenue will fund things such as ‘revenue sharing to fund police and fire, health care for senior citizens and children, K-12 education and the Promise Scholarships’ (WWJ).

    There are many disadvantages and reasons there have been proponents to this legislation.One prime reason is the fact that the later serving of alcohol at bars may lead to an increase in drunk driving and could also lead to over-serving at these bars. Some other concerns are that the bar-goers will be driving into earlier hours of the morning that may begin to coincide with rush hour, which would cause more danger due to the increase of traffic.

    Some legislators have let it be known that they are against this piece of legislation proposed by Governor Granholm. Representative John Proos (R-St. Joseph) has been very open about his disapproval of this bill mainly because of the adverse effects it would have on the communities. Rep. Proos was quoted in the Herald Palladium as saying: "I voted 'no' in committee because of the concerns for safety and security, and for the incidence of drunk driving and having more problems in our local communities” (Herald Palladium).

    Although there are many proponents to this piece of legislation, the bill (HB 5056) was approved by the House Appropriations Committee.

    Sources:

    1. House Committee Approves Longer Bar Hours. 8 October 2009. WWJ Newsradio 950.
    2. Last call at 4 A.M.? Allen, Kevin. 11 October 2009. Herald Palladium.
    3. A later last call? Swartz, Michelle. 2 March 2009. Monroe News.
    4. House Legislative Analysis Section. HB 5056. 11 October 2009.

     

     

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