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    The state of Michigan has awarded prisoners early release from captivity due to good behavior for a long time, just like many other states. In 1978, an initiative petition prohibited prisoners from this reward until 1982. Faced with a serious issue of overcrowding, Legislature adopted a new system of "disciplinary credits." These credits can be earned with good behavior, but they can also be revoked if the prisoner acts in a negative fashion, providing the prisoners with a strong incentive to follow the rules. Although this system of credits made people eligible for parole consideration sooner, it was not any type of guarantee that they would be released.
    . In 1998, Truth in Sentencing was passed, which is a state law that eliminates the disciplinary credit system and transition programs for people nearing parole. It requires offenders to serve their entire minimum sentence before they can even be considered for parole. It also invokes a new system of "disciplinary time" in which more time can be informally added to the minimum sentence for each misconduct a prisoner commits. The parole board then considers how much "time" the prisoner has added with their misconducts and can choose not to release them depending on the amount of extra time they have racked up. Those in agreement with this act state that it is dishonest not to have people serve every day of their sentence. Truth in Sentencing affects all crimes committed on or after December 15, 2000 and assaultive crimes committed on or after December 15. 1998.
    Over the last decade that Truth in Sentencing has been in effect, thousands of additional prison beds have been purchased and all of the added costs of overcrowded prisons have cost taxpayers hundreds of millions of dollars. The Citizen Research Council says the sentence is a primary reason the average prison stay in Michigan is so much longer than in other states. In a Senate Fiscal Agency report, figures show that it is also driving up the cost of health care.
    Arguments against the Truth in Sentencing act say that there is no evidence that restoring the sentence credits would harm the public. Research shows there is no relationship between recidivism and length of stay. The justifications are clearly outweighing whatever negative effects the credit system would add. People that have failed to live up to societies expectations and have known punishment all their life, could be given an opportunity to be fulfilled, and feel what it's like to have a rewarding experience for a change. It will not only benefit the prisoner, but also the communities to which they will eventually return.
    In other states, usually some kind of credit is given for good conduct and federal prisoners can receive up to 15% off their sentences. All of these reward systems are used to help control the size of jail populations, manage inmate behavior, and cut down the costs for taxpayers.

    http://www.ludingtondailynews.com/news/54952-state-of-the-state-tonight

    http://www.michigan.gov/corrections/0,1607,7-119-9741_12798-208276--,00.html

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