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  • Interviews

    1. Can you tell me about your professional and educational background?

    Doug Roberts went to Hope College and got a BA in Business Administration and Political Science. He then went to MSU and got his master’s in public administration. After that, he worked as a member of the policy staff in the House of Representatives. In 2002, he started at the Michigan Chamber of Commerce, and he really enjoys it.

     

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    2. What do you do on a day to day basis?

    On Mondays, he generally prepares for the week ahead. This week, on Tuesday, he planned on going to a hearing on a renewable energy bill that would re-allow land waste garbage containers. On that Wednesday, he was going to about the executive order that would merge the Department of Natural Resources and the Department of Environmental Quality.

    3. How do you feel about the DNR/ DEQ merger?

    “I agree with the merger, I just think there are a few details that need to be ironed out first”.

    4. What are the details that need to be ironed out?

    “Just a few things that have to do with organization, like taking the department of agriculture out of it. I don’t think that there should be unrelated items lumped together.”

    5. Who are your legislative opponents?

    “Primarily environmental groups like the Sierra Club, they tend to want to implement everything harshly and too quickly.”

    6. How do you convince legislators to take your side vs. your opponent’s side? Generally, there isn’t that much disagreement on the legislation. He cited one example where a senator from west Michigan got a bunch of groups together to agree on one set of legislation. “Legislators are very good at bringing different groups together to get both parties to agree.”

    7. How does the Chamber determine what side it will take on certain bills?

    There are policy meetings where a law maker will come talk to the group, and then the whole group will vote on the issue. 95% of the time there is a clear majority.

    8. How do you feel about Jennifer Granholms’ trip to Japan to get them to invest in Michigan’s renewable energy sources?

    “I think that it is good to get Michigan’s name out there, I just don’t know how effective those meetings are. I am a bit doubtful about those types of meetings.”

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    About Us

    The Michigan Policy Network is a student-led public education and research program to report and organize news and information about the political process surrounding Michigan state policy issues. It is run out of the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University, with participation by students from the College of Social Science, the College of Communication, and James Madison College. 

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    The thoughts, opinions, and positions represented herein are solely those of the participating students and in no way represent an official position or policy recommendation of Michigan State University.

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    Policy Fellow: Marie Hallberg

    Marie Hallberg is the commerce & regulation correspondent for the Michigan Policy Network and a first-year student at Michigan State University. Currently, she is a no preference major, but is interested in either a teaching or communications degree. Marie is very excited to be attending MSU and anxious to explore the opportunities that are available to her. Marie is originally from Illinois and enjoys hanging out with her family and friends, reading, and being in band. Her career aspirations include a job focused on serving and working with people, possibly in the guest service area. She is very interested in using her experience on the Michigan Policy Network to help better her understanding of the Michigan government and how its policies ultimately affect the citizens of Michigan.