• yourjizzx cum
  • Policy Briefs

    Migratory movements have been a constant throughout the history of mankind, often due to political, social, economic, or natural disasters. However, the hope for better conditions of life and work has always been crucial to all those who choose immigration. The arrival of immigrants into the country encourages the creation of more business, and therefore creates more jobs. The American dream is more than just a fantasy for millions of worldwide citizens. It is an opportunity to seek a better life style for people in need.
    Detroit is facing $20 billion in debt and unfunded liabilities, which breaks down to more than $25,000 per resident. There are many houses available for sale in Detroit for $500 or less. Detroit was once the fourth-largest city in the United States, but over the past 60 years the population of Detroit has fallen by 63 percent. In 1960, the city of Detroit actually had the highest per-capita income in the entire nation. Immigration presents an opportunity to help fill the void in Detroit and contribute to economic development. This, however, would require the immigration processes to be made easier and more available.

     

    . Governor Rick Snyder supports immigration in Michigan and has worked to reform the system. Snyder has worked with the Federal government to create more employment-based visas for experienced immigrants. He has planned to bring 50,000 new immigrants to live and work in Detroit over the next five years. These will be given to immigrants seeking to commit to work in Detroit. With the creation of the Michigan Office for New Americans, Snyder intends to invite and welcome those immigrants with entrepreneurial skills to stay in Michigan, to build companies and employ American citizens.

     

    Governor Snyder cannot guarantee that these new immigrants will stay in Detroit instead of going to Chicago or other cities to find new opportunities. Detroit is not the only city in the United States that needs help from overseas. Several American cities are facing problems as well and should also be able to support increased immigration. Immigration creates jobs. In 2011, twenty-eight per cent of small businesses were created by immigrants and seven out of ten of world’s prized brands were created by United States immigrants or their children. In the last ten years, immigrants created one-third of the high-tech businesses in Michigan. These immigrants with high-tech abilities create jobs for American workers. Every high skilled immigrant that comes to the United States opens two and a half additional jobs for an American citizen.
    Despite support to increase immigration in Detroit to help with its financial crisis, Michigan has, on the other hand, failed to help young students from other countries who want to pursue their education in the states. At Michigan State University while in-State students pay $22,450 for their tuition, international student are obligated to pay $51,454. The exchange rate for most countries makes this even more problematic. Affording to study in the United Sates is becoming a luxury. Representative Sam Singh, (D, East Lansing) has said: “Nowadays only the ‘rich kids’ from other countries can afford to come here (Michigan) and study in an American University”.

     

    The Global Talent Retention Initiative of Michigan was created in 2011 to use the talents of international students to help build a stronger economy in Michigan. This program is sponsored by the Michigan Economic Development Corporation and the New Economy Initiative initially designed after an immigration impact study on Michigan. The results of these studies showed that international students contribute to the economy and result in more employment in the state. GTRI collaborates with Governor Snyder’s office and over 30 Universities in Michigan. The GTRI purpose is to help international students with training, assists with immigration rules and knowledge on how to find a job in Michigan after graduation. Governor Snyder wants qualified international students to come to Michigan, and supports this program in order to familiarize these students with the hiring process in Michigan.

     

    Even though Michigan government has been creating programs to facilitate international students lives, it does not makes it cheaper for them. As an international student at Michigan State University, I put my education first and came to the United States to follow my dreams. These expensive dreams have put my family in an uncomfortable financial situation. The future for students like myself is uncertain. Questions such as employment and being able to obtain a H1 visa can still be problematic, despite the efforts of the GTRI. Immigration should be encouraged not only for the development of Detroit, but also to increase the number of qualified students who want to come to the United States.

    References
    Snyder, Michael. “25 Facts About The Fall Of Detroit That Will Leave You Shaking Your Head”. The Economic Collapse. 7 July 2013

    Office of Admission, Michigan State University, Estimated Costs. Accessed on March 2nd.

    “Snyder announces plan to attract 50,000 immigrants to bankrupt Detroit”. 3:05 PM, January 23, 2014

    “Fact Sheet: Encouraging Immigration in Michigan”. “Immigration and American Jobs” by the American Enterprise Institute and Partnership for a New American Economy, December 2011

    “About the Michigan Office for New Americans”. Accessed on March 17th.

    “Global Talent Retention Initiative of Michigan, who we are ”-Accessed on April 1st.

    Home
    Agriculture
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Commerce & Regulation
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Criminal Justice
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    In The Courts
    Timeline
    Employment
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Great Lakes & Recreation
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Energy and Environment
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Health Care
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    K-12 Education
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Morality and Family
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Political Reform
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Social Services & Seniors
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    State Budget
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Taxes
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Transportation
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline
    Urban Affairs
    Policy Briefs
    Current Issues
    National Context
    Interviews
    Blog
    Most Popular Posts
    Timeline

    About Us

    The Michigan Policy Network is a student-led public education and research program to report and organize news and information about the political process surrounding Michigan state policy issues. It is run out of the Department of Political Science at Michigan State University, with participation by students from the College of Social Science, the College of Communication, and James Madison College. 

    Read more about us...

    Sponsors

    Michigan State University    Department of Political Science 
     College of Communication Arts & Sciences    James Madison College
     College of Social Science    University Outreach and Engagement

     

    The thoughts, opinions, and positions represented herein are solely those of the participating students and in no way represent an official position or policy recommendation of Michigan State University.

    Our sponsors...

    Policy Fellow: Marie Hallberg

    Marie Hallberg is the commerce & regulation correspondent for the Michigan Policy Network and a first-year student at Michigan State University. Currently, she is a no preference major, but is interested in either a teaching or communications degree. Marie is very excited to be attending MSU and anxious to explore the opportunities that are available to her. Marie is originally from Illinois and enjoys hanging out with her family and friends, reading, and being in band. Her career aspirations include a job focused on serving and working with people, possibly in the guest service area. She is very interested in using her experience on the Michigan Policy Network to help better her understanding of the Michigan government and how its policies ultimately affect the citizens of Michigan.